Tag Archives: Marjon Magazine

Deserved?

Where did your school(s) stand on the subject of corporeal punishment? I only went to one where the teacher, a clearly ill-suited matron, was free with her hand and various improvised implements. We lived in terror, and I’m glad that those methods are mostly living in the past. Like this story published in ‘Marjon Magazine’, dated summer 1998:
‘…after one series of tests Mr Hansen called a Welsh boy to the front. ‘I’m going to give you the cane Davies. Do you know why?’ Davies did not know and we could not even guess. Davies was very bright and for non-conformist chapel-goer conformed very well. ‘Because Davies,’ said Mr Hansen. ‘you’re second in the class and but for one stupid error you would have been first.’ Davies was duly caned. None dared complain.’
Yikes! Now whether you’d say he deserved it, or that you think that to err is human, you can clearly see the drive to absolute perfection that was pressed into old way of life- anything but would not be accepted. But my subversive curiosity would not let me stop wondering: if Davies was now second in class, who had risen over him to be the first?:-)

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How to Write Poetry- Marjon Style

Poetry is hard. Especially if you want to be serious about it. Luckily, it is not always a necessity. Today I have a recipe for a poem that is about as serious as a clown with a pie on his face. It was first published in the ‘Ladle’- a students’ humorous periodical. The writer is only credited as Sporus, so if you happen to know that person-let me know. So, let’s see how to write poetry- Marjon style:
ARS POETICA
If you’ve nothing to do for a minute or two
(Though you haven’t a clue in your head)
And you’d like the acclaim of the writers of fame
Whether living or mentally dead
Don’t try to write plays that would run for two days
Or pantomimes, all by yourself,
Or books of the kind that you constantly find
On the threepence of sixpenny shelf
Just think of a phrase, such as *crime never pays*
Or *dinner at seven in hall*
And write it down neatly, in part or completely
With no punctuation at all.
Now add a few more, such as *please shut the door*
Or *dresses in velvet or satin*
Repeat one or two (it’s the right thing to do)
Or write them down backwards, in Latin
Without an apology, take an anthology
Copy the list of first lines.
Leave marks exclamation of interrogation;
Omit the more usual signs.
Now give it a heading like *Grace Kelly’s Wedding*
(Or something that’s equally heady)
Make sure, by inspection, it bears no connection
With what you have written already.
You have now produced verse, modernistic and terse,
The M*rj*n will print it, no doubt.
But please never fret us with capital letters
it’s so much more cultured without.

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Old Adverts- everyday history

What is the most glanced over part of a circular publication? I’d say the editorial notes with the advertisements right behind them. Especially nowadays when we know exactly what kind of deals are at our local supermarket and, if we don’t know, we have Google to tell us. But give or take thirty years and the humble advertisement might become curiously interesting. Suddenly it is fun to find out how much was milk when our grandma got married and what company used to sell donkey stones (pssst… Eli Whalley & Company). Today I have a couple of examples of ‘ye oldie’ adverts from the St Mark College Magazine, and some later ones from Marjon Magazine. Those adverts are especially interesting as they were published in a specialized publication and intended for a specific audience. Most of them advertised local businesses and people that sell school materials, but sometimes you’ve got more general services like coal deliveries.

A name, an address and a sample of the stock- that what you used to get before the mass media spoiled us rotten- an advertisement from the beginning of the 20th century.

A name, an address and a sample of the stock- that what you used to get before the mass media spoiled us rotten- an advertisement from the beginning of the 20th century.

For the modern eyes the adverts from before the true mass media era look really strange. There are whole pages in the St. Mark Magazine before the thirties that are promoting many different things, but there isn’t one with an illustration. And I don’t mean photographs. I mean no graphics whatsoever- no drawing and no logos. Most of them just give a sample of prices for specific articles they sell. It feels a bit austere, but on the other hand I can see how useful it could be- you knew exactly where to go for the things you’d need.

Marjon Magazine 1935- a coal merchants’ advert.

Marjon Magazine 1935- a coal merchants’ advert.

I think that the first illustration I spotted in the issue from the 1935 and it was for a coal supplying company. A bit strange place for a picture, I assume it’s a replica of the advertising poster: Brentnall and Cleland, a coal trading company. This guy seems to know more about them, but I can’t find any picture of an advert poster. Maybe it is the last place you can still see it. Funny where the research can take you.

Visual artists have no need for words!:-)

Visual artists have no need for words!:-)

After that, the magazines started to be less text and more graphic. More and more photographs started to populate the pages. I’d say that some went a little bit overboard, like the Reeves artist’s materials.
Finally, I had a look at the Marjon Magazine’s advertisements from the beginning of this century and found out that, at one point, you could own a Marjon Visa…aww, now I want one too!:-)
I’ve always found the ‘everyday’ history more interesting than the ‘big events’ history. The day-to-day is quick to escape the memory, unlike the grand historical moments. I guess that the old advertisements preserve the simple stuff in a

It's a Marjon Visa, what else could you want?:-)

It’s a Marjon Visa, what else could you want?:-)

strangely effortless way.

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HDC- The ’Miracle Building’

With the JAM department opening earlier this year, I thought that I could look into the past to see how the HDC building came to be. Here are some facts I would like to share and some pictures from the time of the construction.

  • HDS building is the latest permanent construction added to Marjon’s campus.
  • It was dubbed ‘Marjon’s Miracle Building’.
  • It was added to cope with the rise in the students’ numbers.
  • It was the most ambitious project undertaken since the move to Plymouth in 1973.
  • The building was named for Henry Durowse, who was a chairman for 11 years.
  • Works were completed despite many problems: a continuous rain for 120 days and the need to change the construction company.
  • The official opening date was 14 of December 2001.
  • During the opening ceremony a cake was served that was shaped like the building itself. Yum!
The ground had been broken for 'Marjon's miracle building'

The ground had been broken for ‘Marjon’s miracle building’

Can you guess which room you are looking at?

Can you guess which room you are looking at?

A gorgeous sunset over the Chaplaincy Centre and future HDC

A gorgeous sunset over the Chaplaincy Centre and future HDC

The 'backbone' of the building near its completion.

The ‘backbone’ of the building near its completion.

The laying of the characteristic brown brick

The laying of the characteristic brown brick

Almost there!

Almost there!

Having the new JAM department open, with its modern look and new shiny Mac’s, I just wish that we could finally have some proper chairs and tables in the rest of the building instead of those horrible combo furniture:-)

Source:

Marjon’s archive photos

The Magazine of the College of St. Mark and St. John 2002

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